Peer-Reviewed Articles

Green Cities and Ivory Towers: How Do Higher Education Sustainability Initiatives Shape Millennials' Consumption Practices?

Ethan D. Schoolman, Mike Shriberg, Sarah Schwimmer, Marie Tysman. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences 6(3): 490-502.

 

Popular writing on the urban migration of millennials has frequently celebrated the presumed environmental benefits of cities not designed around the automobile. Yet little research has examined how, if at all, institution of higher education (IHE) efforts to shape student consumption practices may impact the sustainability of urban areas. Drawing on survey and focus group data, we find that that student commitment to practicing sustainable consumption in their adult lives is weakest regarding how food is produced and consumed. We also find that evidence for IHE impact on student attitudes and practices related to any form of sustainable consumption is surprisingly lacking. We argue that IHEs have not realized their full potential to prepare millennials to be environmentally responsible citizens of sustainable cities, particularly where participation in food systems is concerned.

 

Class, Migration, and Environmental Inequality: Pollution Exposure in China's Jiangsu Province

Ethan D. Schoolman, Chunbo Ma. Ecological Economics 75 (2012): 140-151.

 

Systematic research into social inequalities in the distribution of environmental hazards, though well-established in American sociology, has largely not been conducted for developing countries. We argue that, due in part to the China's state registry system, urban workers with an official rural residence are disproportionately exposed to environmental pollution. We also argue that environmental inequality in China is shaped by social processes analogous to those which have been held to explain racial differences in pollution exposure in the U.S.

 

How Interdisciplinary is Sustainability Research? Analyzing the Structure of an Emerging Scientific Field

Ethan D. Schoolman, Jeremy S. Guest, Kathleen F. Bush, Andrew R. Bell. Sustainability Science 7 (2012): 67-80.

 

We investigate the extent to which sustainability research lives up to the ideal of an interdisciplinary field that draws on concepts and methods from across academia. We find that interdisciplinarity comes at a cost: sustainability research in economics and the social sciences is centered around a relatively small number of interdisciplinary journals, which may be becoming less valued over time. These findings suggest that, if sustainability research is to live up to its interdisciplinary ideals, researchers must be provided with greater incentives to draw from fields other than their own.

 

Selected Essays and Short Pieces

Big-Box Stores

Ethan D. Schoolman. Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Consumption and Consumer Studies. (forthcoming)

 

Green Horizon: The Theory and Prospects of Thomas Lyson's "Civic Consumption"

Ethan D. Schoolman. Sociological Forum 26 (2012): 460-464.


Bush (George H.W.) Administration

Ethan D. Schoolman. In Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change, 2nd Edition, edited by S. George Philander, pp. 164-166. Sage Publications (2012). 

 

Carter Administration

Ethan D. Schoolman. In Encyclopedia of Global Warming and Climate Change, 2nd Edition, edited by S. George Philander, pp. 210-212. Sage Publications (2012).

 

Selected Works in Progress

Be a Good Shopper, or Shop for Good? Non-Monetary Costs in Socially Responsible Purchasing

Ethan D. Schoolman

 

Green Cities and Ivory Towers: How Do Higher Education Sustainability Initiatives Shape Millennials' Consumption Practices?

Ethan D. Schoolman, Mike Shriberg, Sarah Schwimmer, Marie Tysman

 

"All Politics is Local"—But All Shopping is Not: The Origins and Aims of "Buy Local" Campaigns

Ethan D. Schoolman

 

Creating a Business Sustainability Center and Building Capacity

Jeremy Moon, Ethan D. Schoolman